Bokeh Pricing

Bokeh has been available for purchase almost as long as our little studio has existed, within that time we’ve been lucky enough to have some of the top companies in visual effects use it on ground breaking productions.

As with all our projects Bokeh was initially developed for internal needs but due to interest from other parties we made it available for outside consumption, at that time we weren’t sure how we wanted to price it as a product and ultimately settled on a rate that was extremely aggressive with the aim of making it as accessible as possible.

Over the years we’ve made small adjustments to this rate, the biggest step was quickly moving from a perpetual model to the need for annual support fees to maintain a license. Even with 20 years of VFX production experience and having managed large scale development internally, the leap to selling and supporting software to a large (and demanding) user base was (and still is) a learning experience and our initial pricing was off.

Over the last six months it has become obvious that we needed to take our pseudo-subscription model and update it to a plain and simple annual subscription one. Our assumptions about how customers would be using the licenses differed from reality, rather than staying continually on maintenance; licenses would only be used/purchased when needed, sometimes years apart. This led to some confusion as to how and when maintenance could be renewed and the implications of the timing, many customers reached out and asked us to come up with another plan. In addition to this confusion with the annual maintenance model, it wouldn’t have made sense to maintain Bokeh’s availability if we stayed the course we were on.

As of now all Bokeh licenses are considered annual subscriptions, there is a single price for both a site license and single licenses with both floating and node locked (for single) options now being offered.

This means there is no longer an annual maintenance price, when a license expires a new annual subscription can be purchased with no time limit for how soon that needs to happen after expiry. If you purchase a new subscription prior to the expiration date of a previous annual term we’ll ensure the new license starts at the end of said term – otherwise it will start on the day of purchase.

Making this change isn’t something we’ve taken lightly and understand that this may impact some studios continued use of Bokeh. We are extremely humbled by the amazing craftsperson-ship of our customers and hope to continue our relationship with as many as possible.

Update: Single license pricing has been reduced to $129 p/a for a floating license and $99 p/a for a node-locked one.

A CGI Dog from Finish using Yeti and Bokeh

When Finish CG Supervisor Harin Hirani was tasked with creating a realistic dog for UK Life Insurance company, Beagle Street, he chose to use both Yeti and Bokeh to get the desired result. We recently spoke with Harin and asked about his experience using both of our products together – here’s what he had to say.

“The job required a photo realistic CGI dog which consisted of multiple fur elements such as the main body, whiskers, eyelashes and eyebrows.  I was responsible for all look development of the dog which included modelling, texturing, shading and the fur grooming. The dog appears in the majority of shots ranging from full body wide shots to extreme facial close ups.”

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“We were exploring a number of fur solutions for this particular job as we needed something that could give us more control and flexibility than what we currently had.  We quickly fell in love with Yeti’s node based workflow and the power it gave us to create and layer up multiple complicated fur systems. The dog has very specific fur characteristics that change over different parts of the body so we knew we would need to have the ability to match this easily.”

He went on to tell us that, “The advert itself was shot with very narrow depth of field so we knew we would need to match the defocus and with the render times being expensive, rendering the depth of field in the renderer wasn’t an option.  That’s when we looked into rendering this job in deep and using post Bokeh as it gave us very clean artifact free blur and natural lens defects like chromatic aberration and the ability to make adjustments to these at the compositing stage.”

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When asked, if he was able to achieve all of his goals for the project and if Yeti and Bokeh accommodated all of his needs, Harin told us that, “We had a very good system in place using Yeti whereby we could carry on working with the model and the groom in parallel and know that we could update everything accordingly before sending things off to render. Yeti made it very easy to accommodate changes in the pipeline. Using Bokeh allowed us to achieve a natural defocus on the dog which meant he sat in quite convincingly on the live action plates.”  We’d have to agree with him on this!

Harin also added, “We were really impressed with the speed of the viewport previews; this helped us massively when we were creating the look of the fur.  It was nice having the confidence of knowing what we see in the viewport is a good representation of what we would get at render time!”

We think this spot is great and love that both Yeti and Bokeh were used together.  Well done, Harin and the team at Finish!

View the full spot here.

Defocusing Bricks with Bokeh, Animal Logic and The Lego Movie

Julien Leveugle, Compositing Supervisor for Animal Logic’s The Lego Movie, took some time to share details with us about Bokeh’s involvement with the production.

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“We used Bokeh extensively on The Lego Movie, due to the miniature nature of the Lego figurines we went for a shallow depth of field look. I would say that about 90% of the shots of the movie contain Bokeh one way or an other, sometimes used to achieve extremely shallow depth of field.”

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Peregrine at FMX 2013

We had a wonderful time in Stuttgart, thank you to everyone involved and those who we had time to meet!

FXGuide has coverage of Bokeh mentioned during the Pixar presentation of their new short film and a follow up FXGuideTV episode that goes into more detail.

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Hopefully we’ll see everyone there next year. 🙂

Bokeh @ the Geek Fest

Don’t miss Johannes Saam and Denis Scolan share the great work done on Prometheus by Fuel VFX at this years Geek Fest held by The Foundry at Siggraph 2012. Bokeh was used within Fuel’s deep compositing pipeline to help defocus millions of rendered particles.

© 2012 20th Century Fox. All rights reserved. Prometheus

If you can’t make it to the fest, they will be repeating their presentation in the Foundry booth during the conference – and if you see them during a social gathering, be sure to buy them a drink!